THE LAWSON’S PEAK BOOKS

Voices and Silence

This weekend, Good Lord willing and the Creek don’t rise, the third Bayou Teche Wooden Boat Show will welcome a whole passel of people to Franklin.

Come out and visit us! We expect as many as 50, maybe even more, wonderful wooden boats on Parc sur la Teche.

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“I hear there’s trout up there,” I said.

“There’s trout twenty-five feet from where you’re sitting, and better trout still in the mountains at your back. And if you get up on Hazel Creek and go up the valley some nights, there’s voices on the wind.”

Exie Sopwith was right about Hazel Creek — about its trout, its beauty, even about the voices. – Harry Middleton, “Bagpipes on Hazel Creek,” from On the Spine of Time.

Not long ago, but too long for comfort, I stood on a ledge of sandstone some hours north of here, listening for voices. I wasn’t on Hazel Creek; that gorgeous little stream is a thousand miles northeast of me, deep in the Smoky Mountains. You can only get to Hazel Creek three ways: A 20-mile hike, a 16-mile hike — both over very rugged terrain — or a boat service across Lake Fontana, for . . . → Read More: Voices and Silence

Expansions

Well, come this Sunday, “Native Waters: A Chitimacha Recollection” will begin broadcasting nationally.

A buncha stations across the United States have already picked it up, a quick Google search reveals.

In case your memory is as unreliable as mine, that’s the Louisiana Public Broadcasting documentary I co-wrote and narrated back in 2011 and aired statewide in March. We have since been nominated for an Emmy Award, and won a Telly Award. My good friends and extraordinary filmmakers Tika Lauden, Rex Fortenberry and Charles Richard created quite a masterpiece of a documentary, even with me in it!

I’m kinda feeling like I did when the two episodes of Fly Fishing America I appeared in were broadcast in 2006: Nervous, apprehensive and ready to change my email addresses, phone number and move to Bolivia. But I survived that little jaunt into the wide world of television, and the state broadcast last year, so I imagine I’ll survive this one, too.

So check your local public broadcasting station’s listings and see if it’s on in your area. It might not be right away, but stations have the option to get it at any time, so it might show up later. That is, . . . → Read More: Expansions